Research Highlights

Jerry Lynch

"Smart" Bridges Instrumented with Dense Networks of Wireless Sensors

Prof. Lynch in collaboration with researchers from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) explore wireless sensors for bridge health monitoring.

Current sensors available for installation on bridges are expensive due in part to the need to install wires between sensors. A low-cost alternative to tethered sensors is direly needed to advance the commercial use of structural health...

Jerry Lynch & Michael Kane

Structural Controls: Market-Based Algorithm

'Structural Controls: Market-Based Algorithm'

In seismic regions, some buildings are equipped with mechanical systems to help control their behavior when an earthquake strikes. Restricting the deflection of the structure reduces damage and leads to safer, more durable buildings. One type of structural control system uses magnetorheological (MR) dampers that absorb energy to limit the amount of drift that each story undergoes. The dampers' stiffness can be altered using...

NIST Bridge Project

Exciting New Technologies Used for NIST Bridge Infrastructure Project

Many exciting new technologies are being utilized for a project led by Dr. Jerry Lynch and funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The project focuses on bridge infrastructure, and techniques to improve monitoring and maintenance systems. Now it it's second year, the project has participants from various departments in the College of Engineering, and the private sector. Among the...

MMI NSF-Grantees Conference

UM-CEE faculty and students attended the 2009 CMMI NSF-Grantees Conference in Waikiki Beach, Honolulu, Hawaii, organized by the US National Science Foundation (NSF). In addition to attending conference sessions and activities, some of them also found time to get together and hike up Diamond Head. According to locals, early seafaring visitors saw the hill glinting in the sun, as if studded with numerous diamonds. Eager explorers were disappointed to find that the scintillations were caused by...

Terese Olson

Associate Professor Terese Olson and PhD student Monica Higgins have determined the environmental impact of two ground water remediation technologies: a traditional technology and a newer method currently being studied by several professors within the Department.

The traditional course of action consists of a “pump and treat” system to mitigate a contaminant such as lead or gasoline that infiltrates a groundwater source. In a more passive technology, Permeable Reactive...

Victor Li

Imagine a bridge that requires no maintenance, a road that never need costly repairs. No traffic jams or tailpipe emissions due to reconstruction activities. Such infrastructure is a step closer to reality if concrete has self-healing ability.

A concrete material invented in the Advanced Civil Engineering Materials Research Laboratory (ACE-MRL) at the University of Michigan can heal itself when it cracks. No human intervention is necessary—just water and air. A handful of...

Vineet Kamat

3D Visualization of Simulated Construction Operations in Outdoor Augmented Reality

Prof. Kamat and his group use georeferencing techniques to animate simulated construction processes in real-time

Visualizing planned construction operations in an immersive interactive world improves coordination, safety, and communication during construction.

Prof. Kamat and his group are studying advanced positioning and tracking technologies as well as state-of-the-art...

Lutgarde Raskin & Nancy Love

'Environmental Biotechnology Applied to Water and Wastewater Treatment: Protecting Public Health and the Environment'

Biotechnology can be described as the development and use of engineering methods and systems that take advantage of the beneficial characteristics of naturally occurring microorganisms. Environmental biotechnology aims to apply the principles of biotechnology to address problems of significance to the natural environment and human health. Researchers in the...

Valeriy Ivanov

Tracking the Path of Water through High Performance Numerical Models

Prof. Ivanov and hydrology group simulate water and energy fluxes of large-scale basins

Understanding where and how runoff is generated in heterogeneous landscape is vital for flood-forecasting and land use planning.

Prof. Ivanov and his group are studying land-surface hydrology at the catchment scale. They are employing the physically-based spatially distributed TIN-based Real-Time Integrated...

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